Ask Better Questions

Judith Ross on How to Ask Better Questions

Although providing employees with answers to their problems often may be the most efficient way to get things done, the short-term gain is overshadowed by long-term costs. By taking the expedient route, you impede direct reports’ development, cheat yourself of access to some potentially fresh and powerful ideas, and place an undue burden on your own shoulders. When faced with an employee’s problem, you can respond in a much more value-adding way: by asking the right questions, help her find the best solution herself. We aren’t talking about asking just any questions but, rather, employing questions that inspire people to think in new ways, expand their range of vision, and enable them to contribute more to the organization. Questions packing this kind of punch are usually open-ended — they’re not looking for a specific answer. Often beginning with “Why,” “How,” or “What do you think about…,” they are questions that set the stage for subordinates to discover their own solutions, increasing their competence, their confidence, and their ownership of results.

Personally, thanks to some excellent feedback over the years, I’ve subscribed to the 5WH line of questioning when trying to get information:

  • Who
  • What
  • Where
  • When
  • Why
  • How

Open Specific Windows 10 Settings from Run

Settings Page Command
Account info ms-settings:privacy-accountinfo
Airplane mode ms-settings:network-airplanemode
Backgrounds ms-settings:personalization-background
Battery Saver ms-settings:batterysaver
Battery Saver Settings ms-settings:batterysaver-usagedetails
Battery use ms-settings:batterysaver-settings
Bluetooth ms-settings:bluetooth
Calendar ms-settings:privacy-calendar
Camera ms-settings:privacy-webcam
Cellular ms-settings:network-cellular
Closed Captioning ms-settings:easeofaccess-closedcaptioning
Colors ms-settings:colors
Colors ms-settings:personalization-colors
Connected devices ms-settings:connecteddevices
Contacts ms-settings:privacy-contacts
Data Usage ms-settings:datausage
Date and Time ms-settings:dateandtime
Dial-up ms-settings:network-dialup
DirectAccess ms-settings:network-directaccess
Display ms-settings:display
Display ms-settings:screenrotation
Ethernet ms-settings:network-ethernet
Family & other users ms-settings:otherusers
Feedback ms-settings:privacy-feedback
For developers ms-settings:developers
High Contrast ms-settings:easeofaccess-highcontrast
Keyboard ms-settings:easeofaccess-keyboard
Location ms-settings:privacy-location
Lockscreen ms-settings:lockscreen
Magnifier ms-settings:easeofaccess-magnifier
Manage Wi-Fi Settings ms-settings:network-wifisettings
Messaging ms-settings:privacy-messaging
Microphone ms-settings:privacy-microphone
Mobile hotspot ms-settings:network-mobilehotspot
Motion ms-settings:privacy-motion
Mouse ms-settings:easeofaccess-mouse
Mouse & touchpad ms-settings:mousetouchpad
Narrator ms-settings:easeofaccess-narrator
Notifications & actions ms-settings:notifications
Offline maps ms-settings:maps
Optional features ms-settings:optionalfeatures
Other Devices ms-settings:privacy-customdevices
Other Options (Ease of Access) ms-settings:easeofaccess-otheroptions
Personalization ms-settings:personalization
Power & sleep ms-settings:powersleep
Privacy ms-settings:privacy
Proximity ms-settings:proximity
Proxy ms-settings:network-proxy
Radios ms-settings:privacy-radios
Region & language ms-settings:regionlanguage
Sign-in options ms-settings:signinoptions
Speech ms-settings:speech
Speech, inking, & typing ms-settings:privacy-speechtyping
Start ms-settings:personalization-start
Storage Sense ms-settings:storagesense
Tablet mode ms-settings://tabletmode/
Themes ms-settings:themes
Typing ms-settings:typing
VPN ms-settings:network-vpn
Wi-Fi ms-settings:network-wifi
Windows Update ms-settings:windowsupdate
Work access ms-settings:workplace

Source: How to open various Settings pages directly in Windows 10

Convenience

Chris Dancy recently tweeted, “We don’t have a privacy problem with data we have a conveniency problem with data.” How true. We live in a day and age when we have become more desensitized to how our data is used to make our lives just a little more convenient. Earlier this week, Wired also published a great story on Disney’s MagicBand. Colleagues at work have described first hand how convenient the Disney MagicBand made their trip by allowing for things like unlocking your door at a Disney Resort hotel room, entering theme and water parks, checking in at FastPass+ entrances, connecting Disney PhotoPass images to your account and even charging food and merchandise purchases to your Disney Resort hotel room. Convenience?

It’s delightful, and it took hold faster than the goosebumps could. The utility seems so obvious, your consent has simply been assumed.

Source: Disney’s $1 Billion Bet on a Magical Wristband