How to add a conference bridge and passcode to Contacts

Recently, I’ve had the need to:

  1. Track multiple conference bridge lines and appropriate leader or participant passcodes in my Contacts and be able to dial them easily when necessary
  2. Send out meeting/calendar invites that include the conference bridge line and appropriate leader or participant passcode and make it easier for someone else to dial in

With both situations, save the number and passcode as a single phone line entry but use a comma (,) to add a 2 second pause or a semi colon (;) for a hard pause – implying the next sequence of numbers won’t be dialed unless a key is pressed on the phone.

For example, if the number 800-123-4567,,,1234567# is saved as a contact or used in a meeting invite, and you attempt to dial the number on an iPhone, here’s what you’ll observe:

  1. 800-123-4567 number is dialed
  2. 6 second pause to allow for the conference greeting. (Each comma is a 2 second pause)
  3. Passcode 1234567 is entered followed by the # key

 

Sleep

So what this new research tells us, then, is that the one thing that all of you already knew about sleep, that even Galen understood about sleep, that it refreshes and clears the mind, may actually be a big part of what sleep is all about. See, you and I, we go to sleep every single night, but our brains, they never rest. While our body is still and our mind is off walking in dreams somewhere, the elegant machinery of the brain is quietly hard at work cleaning and maintaining this unimaginably complex machine. Like our housework, it’s a dirty and a thankless job, but it’s also important. In your house, if you stop cleaning your kitchen for a month, your home will become completely unlivable very quickly. But in the brain, the consequences of falling behind may be much greater than the embarrassment of dirty countertops, because when it comes to cleaning the brain, it is the very health and function of the mind and the body that’s at stake, which is why understanding these very basic housekeeping functions of the brain today may be critical for preventing and treating diseases of the mind tomorrow.

Source: One more reason to get a good night’s sleep

Should you Friend your Supervisor?

David Perry writes on the dilemma with maintaining boundaries between work and private spaces on social media, and choices of not allowing colleagues into our private social space.

In a world in which virtual scholarly networks increasingly overlap with our personal virtual communities, we need to develop some clear standards with how we engage on social media with our colleagues, superiors, and subordinates. Here are my suggested rules:- Be aware of workplace hierarchies and your position in them.- You get to choose whether to “friend up” to people more powerful than you in the hierarchies.- You do not get to choose whether to “friend down” to your subordinates. They get to make that choice.- Either accept 100 percent of friend requests from subordinates or accept none. No middle ground.

Source: Should you Friend your Supervisor?

Hiring

Hire and promote first on the basis of integrity; second, motivation; third, capacity; fourth, understanding; fifth, knowledge; and last and least, experience. Without integrity, motivation is dangerous; without motivation, capacity is impotent; without capacity, understanding is limited; without understanding, knowledge is meaningless; without knowledge, experience is blind. Experience is easy to provide and quickly put to good use by people with all the other qualities.

Source: Dee Hock on Management