Sleep

So what this new research tells us, then, is that the one thing that all of you already knew about sleep, that even Galen understood about sleep, that it refreshes and clears the mind, may actually be a big part of what sleep is all about. See, you and I, we go to sleep every single night, but our brains, they never rest. While our body is still and our mind is off walking in dreams somewhere, the elegant machinery of the brain is quietly hard at work cleaning and maintaining this unimaginably complex machine. Like our housework, it’s a dirty and a thankless job, but it’s also important. In your house, if you stop cleaning your kitchen for a month, your home will become completely unlivable very quickly. But in the brain, the consequences of falling behind may be much greater than the embarrassment of dirty countertops, because when it comes to cleaning the brain, it is the very health and function of the mind and the body that’s at stake, which is why understanding these very basic housekeeping functions of the brain today may be critical for preventing and treating diseases of the mind tomorrow.

Source: One more reason to get a good night’s sleep

HIPAA Settlement Underscores the Vulnerability of Unpatched and Unsupported Software

From HHS, a bulletin concerning a settlement following a malware incident in 2011 that might have been avoided had the covered entity updated and patched their software: Anchorage Community Mental Health Services (ACMHS) has agreed to settle potential violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Security Rule with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office for Civil Rights (OCR). ACMHS will pay $150,000 and adopt a corrective action plan to correct deficiencies in its HIPAA compliance program. ACMHS is a five-facility, nonprofit organization providing behavioral health care services to children, adults, and families in Anchorage, Alaska.

Source: HIPAA Settlement Underscores the Vulnerability of Unpatched and Unsupported Software

Related: Resolution Agreement (PDF)

Should you Friend your Supervisor?

David Perry writes on the dilemma with maintaining boundaries between work and private spaces on social media, and choices of not allowing colleagues into our private social space.

In a world in which virtual scholarly networks increasingly overlap with our personal virtual communities, we need to develop some clear standards with how we engage on social media with our colleagues, superiors, and subordinates. Here are my suggested rules:- Be aware of workplace hierarchies and your position in them.- You get to choose whether to “friend up” to people more powerful than you in the hierarchies.- You do not get to choose whether to “friend down” to your subordinates. They get to make that choice.- Either accept 100 percent of friend requests from subordinates or accept none. No middle ground.

Source: Should you Friend your Supervisor?

Hiring

Hire and promote first on the basis of integrity; second, motivation; third, capacity; fourth, understanding; fifth, knowledge; and last and least, experience. Without integrity, motivation is dangerous; without motivation, capacity is impotent; without capacity, understanding is limited; without understanding, knowledge is meaningless; without knowledge, experience is blind. Experience is easy to provide and quickly put to good use by people with all the other qualities.

Source: Dee Hock on Management

If You Accept It, Expect It

If the player lines up two yards over the start line in sprints and you do not correct him, do not jump his butt when he does it in the game . …If you do not correct the offensive lineman in practice for holding, do not bitch at the official for calling it in the game. If you accept it, you should expect it in the games, and that is on the coach.

– Chip Kelly

Source: The Tao of Chip Kelly by Mark Saltveit.